GLIThe Glengary Light Infantry Fencibles
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 20, 2006 9:55 pm 
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Location: Upper Canada
*From the journal of Lt. John Le Couteur, D.E. Graves. Carlton University Press, Ottawa, Ontario. 1993. p.202.

"17 September
On Picquet. A dry night, for a wonder, till daylight when it came on to rain. A Body of the Enemy moved down from Buffalo to Schlosser.

18 September
Sunday. The Enemy surprised our batteries yesterday about three o'clock during the heavy rain and were fortunate to carry three of them. De Watteville's and the Kings, the troops on duty, were forced [back] before the Supports could arrive. The 6th and 82nd [Regiments] recovered [Battery] No. 2, with the Bayonet, and the Glengarry, Royals and 89th [Regiment of Foot] retook the others. We had six hundred men hors de Combat, the Americans double that number. Poor Jack Barstow, my friend and fellow Campaigner, was killed. It was very savage affair, our Men bayonetted every Soul in No. 2 battery, it was full of corpses. We took many Officers and 170 Prisoners.

19 September
Monday. The Yankee Officers came down, thirteen in number. We were just seated to dinner when they were announced and we all rose to give them our seats. They looked very downcast and wretched. However, as we offered them such comforts in washing & preparation as we might, then placed them at our table, they were quite struck with our hospitality and Kindness, and were soon perfectly gay and at their ease. I had to escort Six of them quite alone to Mrs. Willson's [Tavern] at the Falls, upon their Parole not to escape, rescue or no rescue. It was a dark night, raining hard. We had given some of them caps, as they had lost theirs in the fight. I was very glad to get safe with my Prisoners to their quarters and insisted on getting beds for them. One told me " it was the first time He had ever been in an engagement and it should be the last."

20 September
Shot and Shells coming down in batteaux. Smells of a retreat. The Yankees spiked and broke the trunnions of a 24-P[d]r. [gun] and two 18's while in possession of our batteries one short half-hour. On Picquet. Heard that Chippawa Creek is navigable for Vessels of sixty tons, thirty miles up, and for Batteaux, sixty-two miles, within 5 miles of Burlington where the 103rd [Regiment] marched to this day."


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 20, 2006 9:59 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jun 28, 2006 11:33 pm
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Location: York, Upper Canada
I really have to get that book!


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 Post subject: I have a copy
PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 2006 10:19 am 
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Joined: Thu Jun 29, 2006 12:29 pm
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Location: York, Upper Canada
I'll try to find it and bring it to Willow or Chatham.


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